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20121101
20121130
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KRCB (PBS) 11
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
that gave him more latitude with the conservative base of the party. >> woodruff: speak of boston, and other places, let's hear now from our colleagues-- actually, ray suarez is in chicago. he and margaret warner are at the two presidential campaign headquarters, but, ray, we're going to come to you first. are you in chicago, and that's where president obama is tonight. >> that's right. he's just a few miles away. he's not here yet. and neither are a lot of the senior officials from the campaign. i think they probably want to waito see a little bit more, but illinois senior senator, senator dick durbin is here, and there have been a lot of poll closings, a lot of projections, but so far no surprises. what do you need to see before you can really relax? >> some of the key battled ground states-- florida, virginia, ohio, and of course when we get in the midwest, a little closer to my activity in the last few months for the president, taking a look at wis cons and i know iowa. if we can get the job done in the midwest, and i hope we do glie you're not up thisickle. whn you don't have a race, wh
. >> we get a call from the boston police. and they say, "it's a mad scene down here." >> (chanting): we want ted! >> narrator: it was the night of their first debate. >> "we're going to have to get you an escort to get into the building." they had eight or ten motorcycle police officers there to guide us through the mobs of people at the site. >> narrator: it was 47-year-old mitt romney's first campaign. >> and mitt just has this big smilon his face, and he looks at me and goes, "boy, however this turns out, this really makes it worth it." >> narrator: the race had been close. romney needed a great performance. >> i don't think he had any idea what it was going to be like, because he had never done debates under that pressure. >> narrator: he'd gotten into the race because kennedy looked weak, beatable. >> at the time ted kennedy seemed vulnerable. it was a weak period for kennedy. he looked bad, he sounded bad, and in that way he was vulnerable. >> narrator: he was dramatically overweight. there had been trouble with alcohol and women. he'd mortgaged his house to stay in the race. >> r
with the romney campaign in boston and raw suarez at obama headquarters in chicago. >> it's the final frenetic day of the final campaign of his political career. the president ran from state to state starting in madson, wisconsin. the star power was kicked up a notch with an introduction from rock legend bruce springsteen. >> i get to fly around with him on the last day that i will ever campaign. that's not a bad way to end things. >> suarez: mr. obama called on his supporters not to be frustrated by the pace of change. instead, he encouraged them to send a message to those who blockedded his policies every step of the way. >> what they're counting on now is that you're going to be so worn down, so fed up, so tired of all the squabbling, so tired of all the dysfunction that you're just going to give up and walk away and leave them... leave them right where they are. pulling the strings, pulling the levers. and you locked out of the decisions that impact your lives. in other words, their bet is on cynicism. wiscsin, my bet is on you. >> suarez: the president also accused his republican rival of try
. >> it's an amazing epilogue because morgan buys -- owns everything. they sell it to a boston book seller for a thousand bucks. it sits in the basement, treasures of this boston store for almost 40 years. they rediscover hit in the '70s and start to be distributed widely. that's why you see curtis pictures everywhere now. even the "new york times" sells curtis pictures right now. (laughs) >> brown: all right. the book is "short nights of thed that doe catcher, the epic life and immortal photographs of edward curtis." timothy egan, thanks so much. >> thanks for having me, jeff. >> sreenivasan: you can see more of edward curtis's photographs online. we've linked to a collection at northwestern university that includes the entire 20-volumes called "north american indian." >> sreenivasan: and finally tonight, on this day when americans gather to break bread together. we take a second look at a food story far from the u.s. china's growing appetite for meat and dairy products is driving big changes there in everything from farming to food safety. our story is part of our "food for 9 billion" se
to the state of south carolina. when the big east was formed in 1979 it went from boston in the east to syracuse, new york, as its western most outlet. the big 10, as you said, was midwestern schools. the pack 8, which is now the pack 12, was surprisingly enough four schools in california, two in oregon and two in washington. so geography was important, academics were important and competitive levels were important. now the landscape has changed completely. geography has been thrown out completely. academics have been thrown out completely and, to some degree, competitive levels have been thrown out completely because it's all about what schools can make you the most t.v. dollars and a conference and what conferences can make schools the most t.v. dollars. that's the unifying force now. >> brown: so it's dollars and television. particularly in football, right? >> exactly. a all of those thing changes that have happened over a period of ten years now, because it began when the a.c.c. raided the big east for virginia tech, miami and boston college to improve itself as a football confer
at eaton vance management. he joins us from that firm in boston. duncan, i take it you're a pessimist in regards to avoiding the fiscal cliff that we're going to go over? >> not really a pessimist. i think the fiscal cliff is going to be more of a fiscal slope, but there will be a tax element to it. i think because we're starting at such a low level of tax rates, we're very likely to have higher taxes either immediately with the expiration of the payroll tax and potentially on capital gains and dividends in 2013 and beyond. >> tom: how should invests approach that, invest on what tax rates may be next year? >> not really. but there are great costs to be avoided by lessening the tax drag on your investment. positioning your portfolio and making sure you're in sthooks can outperform in a rising interest rate environment-- which is another thing we're worried about-- longer term makes some sense. >> tom: so rising interest rate environment, possibly higher inflation, higher taxes. not exactly the most shiny of forecasts for investors. >> well, there is something you can do about it. you
: you just went to boston-- or to massachusetts to endorse elizabeth warren. >> yes. >> rose: who at one time thought might head up the consumer protection agency. that was not to be. >> right. >> rose: she wasn't even nominated by the president. >> right, right. >> rose: why did you endorse her? not that you shouldn't have, but why did you? >> she's my friend and i worked with her a lot. well, she was actually an advisory committee i set up at the f.d.i.c.,to advicous consumer issues and how to make the banking system more accessible to lower income people. she was a tremendous help in that. and i worked with her when she became the chairman of the congressional oversight panel, nancy pelosi appointment, and we agreed a lot on some of the misuse of tarp funds. and when she became the special adviser to the consumer bureau, i was very supportive of the consumer bureau and tried to make sure the resources of the f.d.i.c. were there early on. we had several years of working together. we don't-- probably on fiscal promise wedisagree a lot. on regulatory policy, consumer protection in partic
romney began his concession speech in boston. miami mayor carlos gimenez apologized to voters, but he insisted officials had done all they could. >> we had a very long ballot. it was the longest ballot in florida history. were there problems in certain precincts? without a doubt. >> suarez: and the county elections department said it was simply a numbers game. >> this is volume driven. >> suarez: late today, election workers in miami-dade county and across florida were still counting thousands of absentee ballots. delays mean the presidential result has not been made final. the state has until saturday to certify results and confirm who will get the 29 electoral votes. for more on the ongoing ballot counting in florida and the sluggish voting elsewhere, we turn to marc cuto,he "mimi herald's" political writer. and curt anderson of the associated press. he's been tracking problems in polling places across the country. i know conditions varied from place to place, but what were the main drivers of the really long waits to cast a vote? >> well, in the case of florida as your piece mentio
're in boston. what's your fundamental thesis? >> the american republic is born partially in a tax revolt. this is the at a party site where they threw the at a over because they didn't like the tax system. so this has been a fundamental debate and argument from the beginning of the american republic. we come back today to exactly the same sorts of issues. >> country men... reporter: well, not exactly the same. the at a parties of the past included smugglers protesting england having lowered the tax on tea, threatening their contraband business. between legend and fact, legend usually wins. the fact is as betweenaying now or paying later, americans have just about always preferred debt to taxes. debt to pay the very first army, for example. this is the spot on the cambridge common where, leng end has it, general washington first amassed his troops under a now dead elm and faced the basic question of government economics. >> how was going to pay them? how is he going to feed and clothe them? where will they get their clothes? that's a question we're still trying to answer. how do we tax ou
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)